Posts Tagged ‘security’

25
Jan

The 7 Network Effects of Bitcoin

by adminadam in articles

Trace Mayer, J.D., a long-time Bitcoin Guru and Investor in Bitcoin companies such as Armory and Kraken, explains the network effects that will lead to Bitcoin’s continued success.

From his talk hosted by CRYPSA at LaGuardia Community College – June 29, 2015.
Listen to the audio: http://www.bitcoin.kn/2015/06/crypsa-event-with-trace-mayer/

The 7 network effects of Bitcoin are as follows:

  1. Speculation — As a novel, cryptographically-backed asset class with the potential for appreciation and high volatility, Bitcoin is perfect for speculators with a high tolerance for risk.
  2. Merchant Adoption — Merchants will increasingly accept Bitcoin because they can increase their profit margins by avoiding credit card fees and chargebacks.
  3. Consumer Adoption — Consumers can use Bitcoin to save money at certain vendors. For example, getting a 20% discount on Amazon by spending Bitcoin through Purse. Additionally, consumers can buy things with Bitcoin that they cannot buy (easily) in any other way. Consider: An American can buy Persian rugs or Cuban cigars online despite trade embargoes. Bitcoin increases the efficiency of the economy, particularly in niche areas such as these.
  4. Security — Merchant, consumer, and speculator adoption lead to a higher price and thus incentivize more miners to participate and secure the system. The decentralized, immutable transaction ledger also serves as a form of Triple Entry Bookkeeping, wherein Debits plus Credits plus the Network Confirmations of transactions increase trust and accountability across the system.
  5. Developer Mindshare — Bitcoin is a “dumb”, predictable network with simple rules and a publicly-auditable codebase. It is fertile ground for the development of complicated algorithms, machine-to-machine payment protocols, smart contracts, and other tools. Its decentralized nature allows for innovation without permission. Altcoins (such as Litecoin and Ethereum) pose little threat as Bitcoin is already dominant as a store of value and as a medium of exchange in the cryptocurrency space. If you harbor doubts about the importance of this currency network effect — or worry about altcoins overtaking Bitcoin in some other way — I would point you to Daniel Krawisz’ insightful and though-provoking article on the subject: “The Coming Demise of Altcoins“. Ultimately, developers will continue to flock to Bitcoin.
  6. Financialization — Bitcoin will eat up progressively more of the market share of legacy banking institutions in areas such as remittances, micropayments, peer-to-peer lending, and the exchange of stocks and securities. This process has already begun (consider NASDAQ’s support of Open Assets/Colored Coins for the transfer of securities, NYSE’s investment in Coinbase, etc.). Old money risks dying out lest it embrace new protocols such as Bitcoin.
  7. Adoption as a World Reserve Currency — Eventually all transactions will be settled on the blockchain, including house titles, stock purchases, car titles, and other monetary instruments and currencies. Network effects one through six culminate in this final network effect. Any newcomer in the realm of cryptocurrency — or traditional currency, for that matter — would need to beat Bitcoin in all seven of these areas. This is unlikely considering the pace of development in Bitcoin Core, the level of investment in Bitcoin companies around the world, the growth in Bitcoin’s user base, and on and on… Further price increases will only accelerate the process. Finally, a speculative attack could dramatically boost the value of Bitcoin almost overnight.

Bitcoin is a strong currency: it thrives on the internet; it frees its users from 3rd parties; it saves merchants money; it is deflationary; its code can be audited by all; its developers work tirelessly to improve upon it; the list goes on. The above-listed network effects can only serve to strengthen it. Competitors beware.


READ THIS NEXT: Speculative Attack, by Pierre Rochard

An excerpt from the introduction of “Speculative Attack”:

Bitcoin will not be eagerly adopted by the mainstream, it will be forced upon them. Forced, as in “compelled by economic reality”. People will be forced to pay with bitcoins, not because of ‘the technology’, but because no one will accept their worthless fiat for payments. Contrary to popular belief, good money drives out bad. This “driving out” has started as a small fiat bleed. It will rapidly escalate into Class IV hemorrhaging due to speculative attacks on weak fiat currencies. The end result will be hyperbitcoinization, i.e. “your money is no good here”.

15
Feb

Bitcoin, Extropy, and Market Anarchy

by adminadam in articles, videos

Exponentially expanding hashing power. Fiat money pouring into Bitcoin startups and mining equipment. Digital economies flourishing despite massive QE and the artificial stabilization of the USD and other currencies. And Bitcoin’s in the middle of a period of relatively high inflation itself. And yet… it refuses to die. Bitcoin’s value may be low in terms of dollars and euros and yuan, but what it represents should not be underestimated:

  • The sudden, technological leapfrogging of antiquated payment systems
  • Unchecked divergence from centralized financial control structures
  • A violent tear-away from Keynesian inertia (let them print themselves into bankruptcy, I say)
  • A blossoming of new freedoms, empowering the Average Joe to hold his own money, secure his own stores of value, and hedge independently against insane-and-intentional inflation

Despite the price, all other metrics point to steady growth in adoption: New developers coming on all around the Bitcoin software ecosystem, new users getting wallets, new subscribers to reddit’s r/Bitcoin, and so on… Just since November 2013, we’ve seen 8,000% greater mining hashing power!

bitindexconstituents

See Dan Morehead’s recent talk for more on the adoption metrics and how Pantera Capital puts the BitIndex together.

With all this growth and the increasingly positive attention that Bitcoin is getting, this stark contrast is becoming ever more tangible to people: On the one hand we have our antiquated financial world of centralized, opaque, fiat-based, runaway economies — and on the other — the limitless, novel, and programmable force of innovation that is Bitcoin. Its nature is decentralized, transparent, deflationary, and predictable. Its economics are sane. Its economics are modern (in that they are secure, convenient, fast, and unrestricted).

The free market, an open-source ecosystem of ideas, market anarchy, has produced this technological marvel.

Truly stunning is the notion that through this network — for the first time — not only will you and I be able to converse economically over great distances (and even from space) relatively instantaneously, but also will the devices we use be able to exchange malleable, programmable, and unforgeble assets between each other according to operational limits and supply-and-demand (i.e., machine-to-machine purchases).

The internet of things could grow out of this: one asset class, one identifier per device; one separate asset class and token for permissible actions and permissions for each device interaction. A unit as small as a satoshi serves as a class or identifier in the blockchain; ethereum, bitcoin sidechains, or some other “Bitcoin 2.0” layer encodes and manages and tracks it. When no longer needed, the sidechain is released, its original satoshi returned to the main pool of bitcoins.

moneyprotocol

Mutual exchange of assets, of value, facilitated by open-source, libertarian-inspired software. Opening before us is an agora, a counter-economic, apolitical, parallel construction, forged in the minds of early 90’s e-cash theorists. The Bitcoin Agora is simply the amalgamation of sovereign actors making independent transfers of wealth without permission. Voting to approve of taxpayer money reallocation is not a prerequisite (or a priority) for the agorists of Bitcoin. They will buy and claim and transfer property with any given and legitimately-earned coin they wish — for as long as they want — despite the legal and regulatory mandates of old-world nation states. The extropy, this synergy between open-source software and distributed, digital, programmable money is unprecedented. And we have only just begun to unlock its full potential.

Change is in the air.

26
Jan

Secure and Backup Your Crypto Coins

by adminadam in articles

  • Secure and backup your cryptocurrency.

  • Create redundant encrypted local copies of your wallet.dat files.

  • Create a triple-encrypted, double-obfuscated volume containing all your crypto-wallets (using 7-Zip and TrueCrypt).

  • Securely upload, email, share, and place this volume on the cloud.

~ LA PRIMERA ETAPA ~

The first step is to secure your crypto-stash locally:

  1. Sync your wallet with the bitcoin-litecoin-dogecoin-whatevercoin network.
  2. Encrypt your wallet with a good, strong password, either 10+ random characters or 8+ random words. Ideally, you should use 14+ random characters, despite what the bitcoin-qt wallet shows you:

encrypt wallet
Now it is impossible for someone to pilfer your coins without some Mega-Serious Cracking Abilities (MSCA).

~ LA SEGUNDA ETAPA ~

Your wallet is secured, however, it must be backed-up in multiple (i.e. three or more) locations.

I save an extra wallet copy in a folder in My Documents, and another copy in another folder on my external hard-drive. I also occasionally backup my important folders and my whole system on a third hard-drive.

Typically you can find your original wallet location on your computer by typing the following into the Start Menu search area:

%APPDATA%

If you type this in exactly, it should show a folder called ‘Roaming’ in your start menu. Press ENTER and it will transport you to this typically-hidden folder. Inside you should see a number of folders containing application-data, including one titled Bitcoin, and perhaps others, Dogecoin, etc. if you have them installed.

When you enter the Bitcoin folder, you will see a number of things. One is ‘wallet.dat’. This small file contains your entire stash of coins, now protected if you’ve encrypted it in LA PRIMERA ETAPA.

Each time you want to duplicate and backup this ‘wallet.dat’ file, you should do the following:

  1. In your Bitcoin/Othercoin wallet program, choose ‘File > Backup Wallet’.
  2. NAME IT: Something indicating the Coin-type and the date would be good.
  3. CHOOSE A DESTINATION: Somewhere safe. Multiple media types are ideal: CD’s, USB’s, Hard-drives, Floppies, etc.

~ LA TERCERA ETAPA ~

Now your stash is encrypted and well backed-up — assuming you named and backed-up your wallet.dat file in 3+ places in a way and manner in which you will not lose or forget these files exist.

The next step is an added layer (or two) of extropy needed to protect your coins from totally ridiculous calamities, such as fires, floods, earthquakes, and nuclear bombs.

If your house burns down and your physical backup media are destroyed, you’ve also then lost your ‘wallet.dat’ backup files. Coins gone. Bummer, man!

This is where the cloud can be useful, however — CAVEAT EMPTOR — there is a smart way and a dumb way to do this. I will, of course, explain the smart way. (The dumb way would be to not add any additional protections… or to make the file public… or to advertise its existence to everyone.)

TWO DISTICT PROGRAMS will be explored here as means of adding two additional layers of protection to your entire stash (multiple wallets and coin types included). They are:

7-Zip — This compression program can also encrypt and password protect each of your ‘wallet.dat’ files while adding a layer of obfuscation which would prevent outside observers from viewing filenames contained within. (It encrypts the filenames, hiding transaction logs and address lists from view.)

TrueCrypt — This creates an encrypted, password-protected volume (think: folder) in which you can store each of your now-obfuscated, now-twice-encrypted ‘wallet.dat’ files.

Steps to follow using 7-Zip for each ‘wallet.dat’ file:

  1. Install 7-Zip.
  2. Right-click the first ‘wallet.dat’ file.
  3. Select 7-Zip in the menu, then click ‘Add to Archive’.
  4. In ‘Archive:’, change the name to something unrelated to wallets and coins and doges (oh, my!).
  5. In the ‘Add to Archive’ window, first check that ‘Archive format:’ shows ‘7z’.
  6. Ensure that ‘Encryption method:’ shows ‘AES-256’.
  7. Check the box for ‘Encrypt file names’.
  8. Create a strong password that is different from the one used to encrypt the ‘wallet.dat’ file intially. Again, ideally 14+ random characters or 8+ random words. (As with all steps in this process, you’re screwed if you forget or lose this password.)
  9. Press OK when your password is in.

You should now have an obfuscated, double-secured ‘wallet.dat’ file. Unless you tell someone (or give someone your password), at this point no one will be able to know what-the-crap this archive is, much less gain access to it, absent, again, Mega-Serious Cracking Abilities (MSCA).

Once you have 7-Zipped all your ‘wallet.dat’ files for all your coins, proceed to the TrueCrypt phase…

Steps to follow with TrueCrypt for your collection of Wallet Archives:

  1. Install TrueCrypt.
  2. Open TrueCrypt.
  3. Select ‘Create Volume’.
  4. Ensure ‘Create an encrypted file container’ is selected, and press NEXT.
  5. Here we have an option to create a ‘Standard’ or a ‘Hidden’ TrueCrypt volume. For now, we will simply create a ‘Standard’ volume (Hit NEXT). Later I will detail the steps necessary to create a Hidden volume, which is particularly useful if you believe you may be forced to reveal your password to someone under duress at some point in the future. For now, we’ll just assume a hidden volume isn’t necessary because A) you “don’t have that much money”, and B) you “surely haven’t advertised that you have this special TrueCrypt volume with a bunch of crypto-money in it”.
  6. Choose ‘Select File…’ and browse to a location where you would like to create your TrueCrypt volume, the Desktop, let’s say. We are merely creating a container right now.
  7. After browsing to your chosen location, come up with something inane to name your TrueCrypt container. “photos from joey”, or something to that effect. Type that name into the ‘File name:’ field and hit SAVE.
  8. Hit NEXT.
  9. The next screen allows us to select our encryption and hashing algorithms. For first-timers, the default options AES and RIPEMD-160 are recommended. Hit NEXT.
  10. Next we’ll choose a size for this volume we’re creating. Let’s see, what’s a good size for a spoofed folder full of pictures from Joey? How about 14MB? Should be plenty. The wallet.dat archives are only around 40KB each. Type in an amount ranging from 5 to 20MB. Hit NEXT.
  11. Now we’ll choose a final password. TrueCrypt recommends a 20+ character password, with no easily-guessable whole words. Type in and then re-enter your chosen password. BEFORE YOU HIT NEXT, read about Generating Entropy:

    In the next screen, TrueCrypt will ask you to ‘move your mouse around randomly’ for at least 30 seconds. The reason it is doing this is to collect random data — from your mouse movements — with which to scramble and improve the encryption of your TrueCrypt volume. Be ready to move your mouse around randomly for 30 to 90 seconds before you hit NEXT.

  12. Hit NEXT and begin moving your mouse around randomly. (The VOLUME FORMAT screen should be displayed now). Continue to move your mouse around for at least 30 seconds. After you are either content or tired of moving your mouse around for no apparent reason, click FORMAT. No need to edit any options here.
  13. After you hit FORMAT, wait for your volume to be created. NOTE: This may take a while if you chose a large volume size. When it has finished, it will show a dialog box indicating that “The TrueCrypt volume has been successfully created.” Hit OK.
  14. In the next screen, “Volume Created”, hit EXIT.
  15. Next we will browse to our TrueCrypt volume and mount it from the main TrueCrypt window. (NOTE: If you don’t have the main TrueCrypt window open any more, simply re-open TrueCrypt from the Start Menu.) From within the main window, select an available drive. If you have dozens of hard-drives or CD drives in your computer, you’ll have to choose from amongst the later drive letters in the alphabet. I’m choosing ‘M:’ for “Mega Serious”.
  16. Click ‘Select File…’ after choosing your drive letter.
  17. Browse to and select your inanely-named TrueCrypt Volume, ‘photos from joey’ — or whatever it is you called it. Hit OPEN.
  18. In the main TrueCrypt window, hit MOUNT.
  19. Enter your password and hit OK.
  20. If you have successfully mounted your volume, the name, size, encryption algorithm, and type will show up in the main TrueCrypt window next to the drive letter onto which you chose to mount it. You can now open the volume as you would any other drive or folder. Either double-click on the volume name from within the TrueCrypt window, or browse to your list of Hard Disk Drives in Computer and double-click on ‘Local Disk (M:)’. REMEMBER: You may have chosen a different drive letter than me. ;-)
  21. Now we may proceed to the final step of our Cryptocoin Backup Process…

~ LA CUARTA ETAPA ~

This stage is significantly easier than stage three.

  1. Now that you have your TrueCrypt volume created, encrypted, and opened, simply copy and paste (or drag-and-drop) your 7-Zipped ‘wallet.dat’ files into it. Once they are copied into this volume, you can consider them safe. Once you restart or shutdown your computer, even if the power just goes out, your files are encrypted and safe. You can also choose to DISMOUNT your volume from within the TrueCrypt window and EXIT now.

Next time you want to access your files now, remember you will have to:

  1. Open TrueCrypt.
  2. Select File…
  3. Select the volume and click OPEN.
  4. Hit MOUNT.
  5. Enter your password; hit OK.
  6. Double-click on the volume once it is mounted.
  7. Right click on the wallet file you want to open. Choose ‘Open Archive’ with 7-Zip.
  8. Enter the 7-Zip Archive password.
  9. You now have access to your coin wallet again. (REMEMBER: You also encrypted this file. Good on you!)

~ LA QUINTA ETAPA ~

The final stage.

Share/upload/distribute your triple-encrypted, double-obfuscated TrueCrypt Multi-Wallet Backup System Volume (just one single file now) to a few trusted friends or locations.

You can now safely store this file in your email account, your dropbox, on your smartphone, on a friend’s hard-drive, and so on. The sky’s the limit!

~ LA EXTRA ETAPA: Can you Grok it? ~

I personally can’t grok any more today. I intended to add a section on creating a special hidden volume with TrueCrypt in which to place our ‘wallet.dat’ files. For now I’m quite content with this beginner’s guide. Please see: http://www.truecrypt.org/docs/hidden-volume to read up on Hidden Volumes and try it yourself if you feel so inclined. I may choose to update this guide in the future with a Hidden Volumes tutorial section. We’ll see.

~ LOS RECURSOS QUE UTILICÉ PARA ESCRIBIR ESTA GUÍA ~

(1) http://www.bitcoincreator.com/bitcoin-wallet/how-to-backup-bitcoin-wallets/
(2) http://www.nextofwindows.com/using-7-zip-to-compress-and-encrypt-your-files-and-folders/
(3) http://www.truecrypt.org/docs/tutorial
(4) http://www.7-zip.org/
(5) http://www.truecrypt.org/

27
May

The Extropy of Linux

by adminadam in articles

Allow me to revel for a second in the beauty of millions of volunteers working together from around the world to build free and open-source (and awesome) alternatives to the profit-driven, privacy-abusive, user-patronizing, security-lax, and design-arbitrary Corporate Operating Systems of the Modern World, namely: Windows and Mac OSX.

Here goes: Linux, along with Wikipedia, Wikileaks, the Bitcoin Crowd, Anonymous, Firefox, Diaspora*, and the Occupy Movement may just represent the pinnacle of human cultural development as it stands in the 21st century. That is, at its core, it (Linux) has Freedom, Respect for the dignity of individual humans and human communities, Love and the love of Art and Aesthetics, and Truth as both its mode of operation and its end goal (product, in this case). Both path and destination are glorious. What does Microsoft want from you? Servitude. Apple? Your Soul. And if we look at the other fields I’ve jacked into the equation here, what does Chrome want from you — being another semi-open-source browser with great design and functionality? Your Data, of course. All your data are belong to us. Linux is divergent; counter-culture. Eventually, hopefully, it will be the new norm for you and me.

</revel>

With these idealistic ends in mind I’ve decided to go all out and bring my best Thrivenotes-y analysis of the top 10 Linux Distributions to you, dear reader, in the hopes that it will help you consider your options, firstly, and secondly, know where to start for when you decide that you’ve had enough of Big Brother Data Corp and Their Friends.


First off, let’s give us a definition here, shall we?

What is Linux? Surely our friend Wikipedia can answer that!

This from the Simple English Version:

Linux or GNU/Linux is a free and open source software operating system for computers. The operating system is a collection of the basic instructions that tell the electronic parts of the computer what to do and how to work. Free and open source software (FOSS) means that everyone has the freedom to use it, see how it works, and change it.

What does it do?

It basically allows you to do all the things you would normally do with a computer. Go online, check your email, organize your photos, write letters and documents, create art, play videogames, listen to music, etc., etc..

What doesn’t it do?

Linux is all about free software. With that said, some types of Linux are (by design) not very good at using proprietary software, such as Microsoft Office or Adobe Photoshop. With that said, there are some pretty kick-ass (as in free, as in beer) alternatives, namely: OpenOffice or LibreOffice, and GIMP or Inkscape.

What are the most popular flavors — or types — of Linux?

Ubuntu is the name most people who’ve heard of Linux will recognize. It is amongst the best known. It is, however, the LAST flavor of Linux that I would recommend. Canonical, the company that creates it, seems to have, by default, set it up so that it will share with the company (and any other 3rd parties it deems business-worthy) what you are doing on your computer, what you are searching for (on your own computer), and possibly more. Frankly, Ubuntu makes open-source look bad. Open-source, and Linux as a whole, is all about respecting user privacy and user needs. Canonical (and Ubuntu by extension) have changed the way they do business in a fundamental way by making this data-sharing an opt-out feature. For that, I strike them from my list.

Let’s get on with it. What else is out there?

So so much!


What if we just did a simple little search for the top ten distributions?

Sounds good to me. According to distrowatch.com, during the last year, the top-viewed (read-about) Linux distributions/flavors have been:

  1. Linux Mint
  2. Mageia
  3. Ubuntu
  4. Fedora
  5. Debian
  6. openSUSE
  7. Arch Linux
  8. PCLinuxOS
  9. CentOS
  10. Puppy Linux

Honorable mentions, which have also been in the top 10 in the past 2 years at some point are:

  • Slackware
  • Manjaro Linux

What should we look at now?

What about Google Search Results for each of these?

OK! Here are our Google Search Results (# of Results) for each of the 12 Linux Distros:

1. Ubuntu – 189.0 million results – Most Recent Version: 13 “Raring Ringtail” – TPB Seeders: ~95
2. Debian – 81.2 million results – Most Recent Version: 7 “Wheezy” – TPB Seeders: ~25
3. Fedora – 55.8 million results – Most Recent Version: 18 – TPB Seeders: ~40
4. CentOS – 38.5 million results – Most Recent Version: 6 – TPB Seeders: ~70
5. Linux Mint – 23.2 million results – Most Recent Version: 14 – TPB Seeders: ~55
6. OpenSUSE – 14.2 million results – Most Recent Version: 12.3 – TPB Seeders: ~30
7. Arch Linux – 11 million results – Most Recent Version: a13-2 – TPB Seeders ~3
8. Slackware Linux – 8.2 million results – Most Recent Version: 14 – TPB Seeders ~15
9. Puppy Linux – 3.8 million results – Most Recent Version: 5 – TPB Seeders ~10
10. Mageia – 1.9 million results – Most Recent Version: 3 beta 4 – TPB Seeders ~40
11. PCLinuxOS – 1.5 million results – Most Recent Version: 2013 – TPB Seeders ~9
12. Manjaro Linux – 383,000 results – Most Recent Version: 0.8.2 – TPB Seeders ~1

Ok, so what do Google Results tell us?

They are an indicator of the popularity of something, but more importantly, this tells me that Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, and the others on top are more likely to have a lot of users and a lot of forums and Q&A and info-sharing communities on the web. This is important to me as I want the most community-supported, most stable, and most accessible Linux distribution possible. Longevity, commonality, and stability are all good extropian (negentropic) criteria to consider. What is the Linux Distribution least likely to disappoint at some point in the future? I believe that this is answerable (roughly) though these surveys I’ve completed: Distrowatch, Google, and #’s of TPB Seeders.

What do the TPB Seeder numbers mean?

Once you decide to get a Linux Distribution to try it out (I recommend VirtualBox for testing them out without replacing your current operating system). Anyways, once you decide you want a specific distribution, one of the fastest ways to get it (download it) is through the bit-torrent protocol. Peer-to-peer downloading, that is. The Pirate Bay is one such place where you could get a torrent file of a distro you want. Also, the more that people are seeding that distro, the stronger a sign it is to me that it is a good one. People don’t (tend to) seed crap (very often), so to speak.

Now to aggregate a bit…

We don’t want Ubuntu. Doesn’t respect privacy.

Long-standing champions in the Linux arena are: Debian, Slackware, Fedora, Linux Mint, CentOS, openSUSE, Arch Linux, and Puppy Linux, as far as I can gather. PCLinuxOS is new to me. We can look into it a bit, but right now let’s focus on eliminating some of those that remain, either because they are too new or because few people are or have been talking about them.

Mageia and Manjaro, you’re out too. No offense.

What are we left with?

1. Debian
2. Fedora
3. CentOS
4. Linux Mint
5. openSUSE
6. Arch Linux
7. Slackware
8. Puppy Linux
9. PCLinuxOS

That’s based on Google. What about distrowatch page views again?

1. Linux Mint
2. Fedora
3. Debian
4. openSUSE
5. Arch Linux
6. PCLinuxOS
7. CentOS
8. Puppy Linux
9. Slackware


Now let’s remove Arch Linux, because although I’m sure it’s great, it is known for difficult installation.

Also, PCLinuxOS, I’m taking you out of the picture for now, not that I won’t come back to you (someday), but we all have limited time here and you only have 1.5 million Google results. You’re getting there, I’d say… ; )

Now we have 7 to look at more closely. These are all seemingly solid, easy-to-access, community-supported, and stable options. Note: I have re-inserted the TPB Seeder “Scores” here…

Linux Mint – TPB: 55
Fedora – TPB: 40
Debian – TPB: 25
openSUSE – TPB: 30
CentOS – TPB: 70
Puppy Linux – TPB: 10
Slackware –  TPB: 15

All have decent numbers of seeders in my view, especially considering that Pirate Bay torrents is not the primary path most linux users would tread to obtain their system images or live CD’s. Most people go to debian.org, for example, or fedoraproject.org, to download directly the distribution they want. It’s just an added bonus in my mind the notion that enough people want it to be rapidly downloadable through torrents (which is amongst the fastest methods of file transfer overall) that they themselves upload and then seed those torrents for you and me. It’s pretty cool. So consider them bonus points — Bonus TPB points, let’s say.

Now let’s organize them by bonus TPB points.

1. CentOS – 70
2. Linux Mint – 55
3. Fedora – 40
4. openSUSE – 30
5. Debian – 25
6. Slackware – 15
7. Puppy Linux – 10

Now we’ll talk about each one a bit. It is nice to know a little about the roots of each, the developers that develop each, the desktop environments offered, and the support life cycle, among other things. I will give a break down for each distribution now then, starting with the candidate I am least likely to pick as my main, everyday, desktop Linux distribution — and ending with my top choices based on my research and experience so far.


Read the rest of this entry »

24
Apr