Posts Tagged ‘a.i.’

1
Mar

AI Metasolutions

by adminadam in videos

Meta-SolutionsWe are dealing with information overload. The data overhang in fields like Big Data and Genomics is crushing us. We lack the means to process so much information. Entertainment, if allowed, could eat more of our time than exists in the universal time remaining. How can we personalize and streamline our data, our technology, and our experiences to maximize our time and innovate more?

aimetasolutions

 

System complexities such as climate and weather patterns, disease and globalization, macroeconomic and political trends, and other physical processes are almost certainly indomitable and inevitably impossible to synthesize perfectly for any unaided human individual at this time. Perhaps A.I. systems and algorithms, such as those being built by DeepMind at Google, can be relied upon to help us become the masters of our time and of our environments. This is the argument — presented quite compellingly, I might add — which Demis Hassabis effectively advances at talk at the RSA conference in November of 2016.

Demis Hassabis on the benefits to humanity of accelerating technology:

15
Mar

I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream

by adminadam in prose

I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream
by Harlan Ellison

Limp, the body of Gorrister hung from the pink palette; unsupported—hanging high above us in the computer chamber; and it did not shiver in the chill, oily breeze that blew eternally through the main cavern. The body hung head down, attached to the underside of the palette by the sole of its right foot. It had been drained of blood through a precise incision made from ear to ear under the lantern jaw. There was no blood on the reflective surface of the metal floor.

When Gorrister joined our group and looked up at himself, it was already too late for us to realize that, once again, AM had duped us, had had its fun; it had been a diversion on the part of the machine. Three of us had vomited, turning away from one another in a reflex as ancient as the nausea that had produced it.

Gorrister went white. It was almost as though he had seen a voodoo icon, and was afraid of the future. “Oh, God,” he mumbled, and walked away. The three of us followed him after a time, and found him sitting with his back to one of the smaller chittering banks, his head in his hands. Ellen knelt down beside him and stroked his hair. He didn’t move, but his voice came out of his covered face quite clearly.

“Why doesn’t it just do us in and get it over with? Christ, I don’t know how much longer I can go on like this.”

It was our one hundred and ninth year in the computer.

He was speaking for all of us.

Nimdok (which was the name the machine had forced him to use, because AM amused itself with strange sounds) was hallucinating that there were canned goods in the ice caverns. Gorrister and I were very dubious. “It’s another shuck,” I told them. “Like the goddam frozen elephant AM sold us. Benny almost went out of his mind over that one. We’ll hike all that way and it’ll be putrified or some damn thing. I say forget it. Stay here, it’ll have to come up with something pretty soon or we’ll die.”

Benny shrugged. Three days it had been since we’d last eaten. Worms. Thick, ropey.

Read the rest of this entry »

10
Apr

Extropy +6: Creative Thinking

by adminadam in articles

How understanding our own minds and the ways that we solve problems will allow us to invent creative machines…

ScienceDaily (2010-12-02) — A mathematical model based on psychology theory allows computers to mimic human creative problem-solving, and provides a new roadmap to architects of artificial intelligence.

Explicit-Implicit Interaction theory is the most recent advance on a well-regarded outline of creative problem solving known as “Stage Decomposition,” developed by Graham Wallas in his seminal 1926 book “The Art of Thought.” According to stage decomposition, humans go through four stages — preparation, incubation, insight (illumination), and verification — in solving problems creatively.

Building on Wallas’ work, several disparate theories have since been advanced to explain the specific processes used by the human mind during the stages of incubation and insight. Competing theories propose that incubation — a period away from deliberative work — is a time of recovery from fatigue of deliberative work, an opportunity for the mind to work unconsciously on the problem, a time during which the mind discards false assumptions, or a time in which solutions to similar problems are retrieved from memory, among other ideas.

Each theory can be represented mathematically in artificial intelligence models. However, most models choose between theories rather than seeking to incorporate multiple theories and therefore they are fragmentary at best.

Sun and Hèlie’s Explicit-Implicit Interaction (EII) theory integrates several of the competing theories into a larger equation.

Read the full article on ScienceDaily.

3
Apr

Extropy +4: Simulating Robot Evolution

by adminadam in home, quotes, videos

“The total disorder in the universe, as measured by the quantity that physicists call entropy, increases steadily over time. Also, the total order in the universe, as measured by the complexity and permanence of organized structures, also increases steadily over time.” — Freeman Dyson